Covid-19: Updates

For the latest numbers regarding Covid-19 infections in Oklahoma, click here:

Oklahoma State Department of Health

To obtain specific information about Bartlesville, scroll down and click on the blue icon titled “View data by city.” If you have questions about this information, please contact the Oklahoma State Department of Health.

 

Current restrictions

The only City ordinances relating to Covid-19 that are currently in effect pertain to City facilities, services and employees. View these restrictions here: City Ordinance No. 3528.

 

August 20 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 50,669 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 10 additional deaths identified to report. One death was identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Cleveland County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Lincoln County, one female and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Four in Oklahoma County, four males in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Pittsburg County, two females in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, one male in 50 – 64 age group.

There are 709 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases 50,669
*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 740,225
*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 800,216
**Currently Hospitalized 564
Total Cumulative Hospitalizations 4,268
Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours 1
Total Cumulative Deaths 709

 

August 19 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 49,923 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 17 additional deaths identified to report. Four deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Bryan County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Creek County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Le Flore County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in McCurtain County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • Three in Oklahoma County, two female and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Five in Pittsburg County, four females and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Rogers County, one female and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Sequoyah County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, two males in 65 or older age group.

There are 699 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results
Confirmed Positive Cases 49,923
*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 732,817
*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 791,944
**Currently Hospitalized 566
Total Cumulative Hospitalizations 4,192
Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours 4
Total Cumulative Deaths 699

 

August 14 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

This week, there are four additional counties in the “orange” risk zone. OSDH continues to monitor closely the statewide hospitalization trends for COVID-19.

Commissioner Frye issued a Public Health Advisory yesterday with the support of Governor Kevin Stitt asking Oklahomans to participate in the following recommendations for the next four weeks to continue to drive down positive cases and help schools open safely:

  • Orange and Red counties: Individuals age 11 and older wear face coverings in public settings, with exemptions including while eating at a restaurant, in a private office space, or at a religious ceremony where physical distancing can be achieved.
  • Orange and Red counties: Restaurant staff wear face coverings and tables should maintain six feet of distance or more.
  • Statewide: Individuals age 11 and older wear face coverings when visiting nursing homes, long-term care facilities, retirement homes, medical facilities, prisons, or other communal living facilities.
  • Statewide: With the “Safer in Oklahoma” policy, individuals entering the State of Oklahoma from an area with substantial community spread, will wear a face covering in all public spaces and limit participating indoor gatherings for 10-14 days in accordance with CDC guidelines.

“While we are encouraged to see our case numbers continue to trend down and our hospitalization numbers on the decline, I want to caution that now is not the time to ease up on our efforts, rather to lean in and continue to be aggressive in steps we are taking to slow the spread,” said Interim Health Commissioner Lance Frye, M.D. in a press conference yesterday alongside Governor Kevin Stitt.

The COVID-19 Alert map will be updated every Friday in the Situation Update at 11 a.m. This week’s map can be seen in this update below the test results chart.

As OSDH continues to meet with stakeholders across the state, the COVID-19 Alert Map is subject to further revisions as science and public health guidance advances with the ongoing pandemic.

As of this advisory, there are 46,897 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are six additional deaths identified to report. No deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Garfield County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Oklahoma County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group and one female and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Osage County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 644 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results
Confirmed Positive Cases 46,897
*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 696,345
*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 751,437
**Currently Hospitalized 567
Total Cumulative Hospitalizations 3,953
Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours 0
Total Cumulative Deaths 644

 

August 12 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 45,398 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 9 additional deaths identified to report. No deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Creek County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Mayes County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Four in Oklahoma County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group and one female and two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group and one male 65 or older age group.

There are 627 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

August 11 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 44,728 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 13 additional deaths identified to report. Three deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Caddo County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Canadian County, two females in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Carter County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in Craig County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Delaware County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Oklahoma County, one female and two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Pittsburg County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 618 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

August 10 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 43,963 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 2 additional deaths identified to report. One death was identified in the past 24 hours.

  • Two in Jackson County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group and one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 605 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results
Confirmed Positive Cases 43,963
*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date  (As of Aug 7) 650,485
*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date  (As of Aug 7) 700,981
**Currently Hospitalized (As of Aug 7) 594
Total Cumulative Hospitalizations 3,625
Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours 1

August 7 Situation Update: Covid 19

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

This week, there are 9 fewer counties in the “orange” risk zone. OSDH continues to monitor closely the statewide hospitalization trends for COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Alert map will be updated every Friday in the Situation Update at 11:00 a.m.

As OSDH continues to meet with stakeholders across the state, the COVID-19 Alert Map is subject to further revisions as science and public health guidance advances with the ongoing pandemic.

As of this advisory, there are 42,255 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 7 additional deaths identified to report. No deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Creek County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in Okfuskee County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Oklahoma County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group and one female and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Stephens County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 600 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

August 6 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 41,401 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 10 additional deaths identified to report. One death was identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Canadian County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Garfield County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Marshall County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Oklahoma County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in Ottawa County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in Pottawatomi County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, one female and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 593 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

August 5 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 40,564 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 17 additional deaths identified to report. One death was identified in the past 24 hours.

  • Two in Caddo County, one female and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Cleveland County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Grady County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Kay County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in McCurtain County, two females in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Payne County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Six in Oklahoma County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group. Three females and two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, two females in the 65 or older age group.

There are 583 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

August 4 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 39,463 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 15 additional deaths identified to report. One death was identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Adair County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Canadian County, one female in the 18 – 35 age group.
  • One in Carter County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • Three in Cleveland County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group and one male and one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cherokee County, one male in the 18 – 35 age group.
  • One in Jackson County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in McCurtain County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Four in Oklahoma County, three males and one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Rogers County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group and one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 566 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

August 3 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 38,602 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There is one additional death which was identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Pottawatomie County, one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 551 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 31 Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

The weekly Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report is now available.

This week’s percentage of positives is the lowest it has been since July 3 at 8.9%.

Oklahoma’s current trend with new positive cases continues to reflect community transmission, which can be reduced by keeping 6 feet of physical distance from others, wearing face coverings when around individuals from outside the household, avoiding touching your face, and regular hand-washing.

Approximately 70% more specimens have been collected and processed in July than last month.

Oklahoma currently ranks 32nd in the number of total reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. and 34th in the cumulative incidence (per 100,000 persons) of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S.

It is critical for Oklahomans to seek out testing, with or without symptoms. Diagnostic testing is freely available to all Oklahomans, and we continue to improve our ability to find and diagnose COVID-19 cases through our contact tracing efforts. If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, a public health worker may try to contact you; the need to adhere to instructions to quarantine and isolate remain critically important.

Reports from weeks past can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 31 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

This week, there are 17 additional counties in the “orange” risk zone. OSDH continues to monitor closely the statewide hospitalization trends for COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Alert map will be updated every Friday in the Situation Update at 11:00 a.m. As OSDH continues to meet with stakeholders across the state, the COVID-19 Alert Map is subject to further revisions as science and public health guidance advances with the ongoing pandemic.

As of this advisory, there are 36,487 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 5 additional deaths identified to report. 3 deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • Two in Cleveland County, two female in the 36 – 65 or older age group.
  • One in Creek County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Oklahoma County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 541 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 30 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 35,740 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 13 additional deaths identified to report. No deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Caddo County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Cleveland County, one male and one female both in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Mayes County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in McCurtain County, one male and one female both in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Oklahoma County, two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Okmulgee County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Four in Tulsa County, two males and two females all in the 65 or older age group.

There are 536 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 29 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 34,623 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 14 additional deaths identified to report. No deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Caddo County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • Three in Cleveland County, two males in the 50 – 64 age group and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Comanche County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in McCurtain County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group and one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Oklahoma County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Okmulgee County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Osage County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Sequoyah County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 523 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 28 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 33,775 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 13 additional deaths identified to report. No deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Canadian County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Garfield County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in Kay County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in McCurtain County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • Two in Oklahoma County, two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Stephens County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Tulsa County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group and two females in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 509 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 27 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 32,686 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are no deaths identified to report.

There are 496 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 24 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

The backlog of 820 positive cases of COVID-19 addressed by Commissioner Frye on Tuesday has been resolved.

This week, there are three fewer counties in the “orange” risk zone. While no counties at this time are in the red zone, OSDH continues to monitor closely the statewide hospitalization trends for COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Alert map will be updated every Friday in the Situation Update at 11:00 a.m. This week’s map can be seen in this update below the test results chart. The COVID-19 Alert System is also updated and available at coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

As OSDH continues to meet with stakeholders across the state, the COVID-19 Alert Map is subject to further revisions as science and public health guidance advances with the ongoing pandemic.

As of this advisory, there are 29,116 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 7 additional deaths with two identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Caddo County, male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Creek County, female in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • Three in Oklahoma County, one female and one male in the 50 – 64 age group and one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 484 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

Confirmed Positive Cases 29,116
*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 493,926
*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 527,895
**Currently Hospitalized 628
Total Cumulative Hospitalizations 2,687
Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours 2
Total Cumulative Deaths 484

July 23 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 28,802 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There were three additional deaths. One was identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Grady County, one male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • Two in McCurtain County, two females in the 65 or older age group.

There are 477 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 22 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

The total number of confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma includes confirmed cases identified as part of the backlog associated with system outages over the past few days. For those backlogged confirmed positive cases, complete demographic information is not yet available. We expect this to be remedied in the coming week.

As of this advisory, there are 28,065 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 13 additional deaths. Two deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • Three in McCurtain County, one female and two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Muskogee County, one female and one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Five in Oklahoma County, three female and two males all in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Seminole County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, one female in the 36 – 49 age group and one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 474 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 21 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

We appreciate your patience as we have worked to resolve technical issues related to data automation over the past few days.

“OSDH’s number one priority is making COVID-19 testing widely available and efficient for the public as well as operating an effective, and trusted, contact tracing program. During this time of increased demand, OSDH is prioritizing manpower and resources to communicate positive results and to provide medical guidance for quarantining and minimizing spread,” said interim Commissioner Lance Frye. “We recognize the significant challenges we’ve experienced with outdated systems, and are working to modernize processes and incorporate new technology to streamline operations and improve critical customer services during the pandemic.”

In its efforts to continuously develop robust contact tracing across the State, the OSDH will begin using text messaging in addition to phone calls to reach out to contacts. We will release more information on this new development including what contacts can expect to see in a text notification.

As of this advisory, there are 27,147 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 9 additional deaths. One death was identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in McCurtain County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Noble County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Oklahoma County, one female in the 36-49 age group and two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Pottawatomie County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, two females in the 65 or older age group.

There are 461 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 20 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

Due to technical data entry issues, case counts for Sunday, July 19 and Monday, July 20 are low and do not reflect real-time data. OSDH’s Acute Disease Service is working diligently to resolve these technical issues and will continue to provide reporting of COVID-19 information that Oklahomans have come to expect from OSDH. In the meantime, Oklahomans who receive a positive test result through a State lab will continue to be promptly notified and connected to contract tracing efforts.

In its efforts to continuously develop robust contact tracing across the State, the OSDH will begin using text messaging in addition to phone calls to reach out to contacts. We will release more information on this new development including what contacts can expect to see in a text notification.

As of this advisory, there are 25,433 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There is one additional death. None were identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Tulsa County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 452 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 16 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

Interim Commissioner Lance Frye announced the new COVID-19 alert system on July 9. This 4-color, county-by-county alert system was built using the White House’s methodology model for new cases per 100,000 population, and it adds an additional color criteria with the “orange” risk category. With OSDH’s alert system, in order for a county to be elevated to the “red risk” category, one of four additional gates must be met that would indicate emerging challenges in the delivery of healthcare services. The gates for the red risk category can be read by clicking here.

This week, 15 additional counties moved in to the “orange” risk zone. While no counties at this time are in the red zone, OSDH continues to monitor closely the statewide hospitalization trends for COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Alert map will be updated every Friday in the Situation Update at 11:00 a.m. This week’s map can be seen in this update below the test results chart. The COVID-19 Alert System is also updated and available at coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

As OSDH continues to meet with stakeholders across the state, the COVID-19 Alert Map is subject to further revisions as science and public health guidance advances with the ongoing pandemic.

As of this advisory, there are 24,140 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are 7 additional deaths with three identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Hughes County, male in the 36-49 age group.
  • One in Pottawatomie County, male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Seminole County, male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Texas County, female in the 36-49 age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, one female and one male that are both in the 65 or older age group.

There are 445 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 16 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt announced yesterday that he has tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Governor Stitt sought out a test after feeling fatigued and had not developed common symptoms, such as fever or shortness of breath. He continues to feel good and is following CDC guidelines by quarantining. In Wednesday’s press conference, interim Commissioner Lance Frye said based on the Governor’s symptoms and timing of his test, the Governor became contagious no earlier than Saturday. All points of contact have been notified and are following quarantine guidance.

As COVID-19 cases continue to rise in Oklahoma, OSDH has released the following guidelines to help you know if you have been exposed and what steps to take.

As of this advisory, there are 23,441 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are six additional deaths which two have been identified in the past 24 hours.

  • One in McCurtain County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Oklahoma County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Osage County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, one female in the 50 – 64 age group and one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 438 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 14 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 21,738 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are four additional deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in McCurtain County, male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Oklahoma County, female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, one female in the 18 – 35 age group and one male in the 50 – 64 age group.

There are 428 total deaths in the state.

Vital Records will open its doors to provide limited in-person services by appointment only starting July 15. Vital Records currently offers affordable and robust online services with a Will Call pilot service planned to launch in August.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results
Confirmed Positive Cases 21,738
*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 419,556
*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 444,852
**Currently Hospitalized 546
Total Cumulative Hospitalizations 2,116
Deaths in the Past 24 hours 0
Total Cumulative Deaths 428

July 7 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 17,220 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There were five new deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Carter County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Delaware County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Garvin County, a male in the 50 – 64 age group.
  • One in McCurtain County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Muskogee County, one female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 404 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 6 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 16,362 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

From July 3 – July 5, there were four new deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Noble County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in McCurtain County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, two males in the 65 and older age group.

There are 399 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

July 2 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 14,539 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are six additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Tulsa County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Comanche County, both females in the 65 and older age group.
  • Three in McCurtain County, a female in the 65 and older age group, a male in the 65 and older age group and a male in the 50-64 age group.

There are 395 total deaths in the state.

The OSDH has launched a new testing site dashboard, which includes an interactive map and updated site contact information. Please call test sites to make an appointment and confirm hours of operation before visiting.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

In recognition of the Fourth of July, all OSDH offices and county health departments will be closed on Friday, July 3. There will not be a Media Advisory on Friday, July 3 or Saturday, July 4, but coronavirus.health.ok.gov will continue to be updated daily with labs processing COVID-19 tests from across the State through the weekend. The weekly Epidemiology Report will be released on Monday, July 6. 

July 1 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 14,112 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are two additional deaths; neither occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • Two in Tulsa County, both males in the 65 and older age group.

There are 389 total deaths in the state.

The State of Oklahoma has set aside a portion of Coronavirus Relief Funds to be distributed in the form of grants, called the LTC CARES Grant, to enhance infectious disease prevention and mitigation as part of the implementation of Oklahoma’s plan for Phased Reopening in Long-Term Care Facilities. Click here to learn more.

The OSDH has launched a new testing site dashboard, which includes an interactive map and updated site contact information. Please call test sites to make an appointment and confirm hours of operation before visiting.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

In recognition of the Fourth of July, all OSDH offices and county health departments will be closed on Friday, July 3. 

June 27 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 12,642 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are seven additional deaths; two of them occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Tulsa County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Caddo County, a male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in McCurtain County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Muskogee County, a male in the 65 and older age group and a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Washington County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 384 total deaths in the state.

This week’s Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report is now available. Reports from weeks past can be found here.

The OSDH has launched a new testing site dashboard, which includes an interactive map and updated site contact information. Please call test sites to make an appointment and confirm hours of operation before visiting.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 26 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

Today’s weekly Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report is now available.

Oklahoma currently ranks 39th in the number of total reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. and 42nd in the cumulative incidence (per 100,000 persons) of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S.

It is critical for Oklahomans to seek out testing, with or without symptoms. Since COVID-19 was first introduced in Oklahoma, testing availability has radically improved and the State’s hospital surge plan remains activated. Diagnostic testing is freely available to all Oklahomans and we continue to improve our ability to find and diagnose COVID-19 cases. The need to follow social distancing guidelines, wear a mask, wash hands often, and adhere to instructions to quarantine and isolate remain critically important.

Reports from weeks past can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 24 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 11,948 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are three additional deaths; none of them occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • Three in Oklahoma County, two females in the 65 and older age group and one male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 375 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 21 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:
Oklahoma State Department of Health Urges Vigilance to Mitigate COVID-19 Spread

Oklahoma City, Okla. (June 21, 2020) – Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) is urging Oklahomans who have chosen to attend large-scale gatherings in recent weeks to seek out testing for COVID-19, even if symptoms are not present.

As previously announced, OSDH encourages Oklahomans to seek COVID-19 testing both prior to attending large-scale gatherings and in the days following, and to wear a mask when physical distancing is a challenge. With active COVID-19 cases on the rise, OSDH is well positioned to support and partner with local government leaders and communities with free testing, resources, and local public health guidance.

“As expected, Oklahoma’s urban areas as well as a few communities around the state are experiencing a rise in active COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations due to increased social activity and mobility. We continue to have more than 80 free testing locations across the state, and we need Oklahomans to get tested, even those without symptoms, so we can identify active cases and work together to minimize community spread,” said Interim Commissioner Lance Frye, MD. “The Stitt administration and the Legislature prioritized COVID-19 data transparency with our nationally-recognized online dashboard. These daily updates protect individuals’ personal information while equipping local leaders with the best data to make adjustments to local public health guidance if needed. Our agency is well resourced to pro-actively partner with and provide guidance to those changes.”

The OSDH continues to make COVID-19 data transparent and publicly available, pointing to evidence-based guidance that allows local leaders, business owners, communities and individuals to make adjustments, and frequently reassess protocols, based on the active presence of COVID-19 locally. OSDH is committed to partnering with stakeholders on crafting recommendations for populations to take proactive measures to keep themselves safe and minimize spread.

Governor Kevin Stitt first charged the agency with a mission to build its nationally recognized data dashboard, launched within a month of COVID-19 arriving in Oklahoma. At the expiration of the Catastrophic Emergency Declaration, Attorney General Mike Hunter determined the Legislature had made appropriate adjustments in State law to allow a substantial portion of the data reporting to continue.

“OSDH has also deployed strike teams across 11 regions in the State to support communities when a COVID-19 hot spot has been identified,” said Commissioner Frye. “These strike teams are comprised of public health professionals, testing experts, and epidemiologists who partner with local stakeholders to increase testing capacity and provide additional infrastructure support and guidance to minimize spread.”

While the rise in cases certainly calls for increased vigilance, the State’s emergency protective supplies and testing capacity remain strong. OSDH’s surge plan remains in place, and daily monitoring and communication continue should a need be identified to activate additional resources.

As to contact tracing, OSDH has hired over 700 full and part-time contact tracers since March 2020 to support these efforts. Additional contact tracers are being hired and trained to expand efforts.

“Personal responsibility remains key in protecting yourself and our local communities from COVID-19. We continue to encourage Oklahomans to consider wearing a mask, to routinely wash hands, and to use physical distancing measures, which are recommendations set forth by the CDC,” says Commissioner Frye, “As a society, we face a delicate balance of creating a new normal that takes into account public health, mental health, and economic risks. It will take all of us working together, as one State, to overcome the many challenges COVID-19 presents until there is a widely available vaccine.”

June 16 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 8,645 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are four additional deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours, all died between June 7 and June 14.

  • Two in Tulsa County, one male in the 18-35 age group and one male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Grady County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Washington County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 363 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 14 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 8,073 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are no additional deaths. There are 359 total deaths in the state.

This week’s Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report is now available. Reports from weeks past can be found here.

While the Reopening Plan for long term care facilities goes into effect on Monday (6/15), please remember that facilities are first required to verify with OSDH that they have updated their infection control plan before they allow visitors. We are working with facilities to develop updated visitation policies.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 12 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

Today’s weekly Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report is now available.

Oklahoma has begun experiencing over the past two weeks an increase in the number of cases and hospitalizations due to COVID-19, though the number of deaths have remained approximately the same and the percentage of positives remains low at 3.7%. The increase in the number of cases is caused by both ongoing community transmission and outbreaks that affect specific populations.

The threat of COVID-19 still exists and we anticipate it to grow. It is critical for Oklahomans to seek out testing. Since COVID-19 was first introduced in Oklahoma, testing availability has radically improved and the State’s hospital surge plan, expanding bed capacity by 40%, remains activated. Diagnostic testing is freely available to all Oklahomans and we continue to improve our ability to find and diagnose COVID-19 cases. The need to physically distance, wear a mask, wash hands often, and adhere to instructions to quarantine and isolate remain critically important.

Reports from weeks past can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 9 Update

Economic Recovery Task Force creates utility, loan programs

The Covid-19 Economic Recovery Task Force has established programs that will pay past due utility bill amounts and offer zero percent interest loans for small businesses in Bartlesville impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

See story here: https://www.cityofbartlesville.org/covid-19-business/

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 7,363 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are five additional deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours, all died between April 5 and June 7.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Muskogee County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Nowata County, a male in the 18-35 age group.

There are 353 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 4 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) is pleased to share that the Attorney General has announced the agency can continue its release of COVID-19 data beyond county levels.
State attorneys will meet today to discuss the legal parameters for which data sets the agency can resume reporting, and we will provide an update as soon as information becomes available.
“It is incumbent upon us as state leaders to protect sensitive health information,” OSDH Interim Commissioner Lance Frye said. “I encourage Oklahomans to use the information to make informed decisions in dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic.”

As of this advisory, there are 6,907 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are three additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 22-June 2.

Two in Tulsa County, one female in the 36-49 age group and one female in the 65 and older age group.

One in Oklahoma County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 344 total deaths in the state.

The Tulsa Health Department is offering free specimen collection for COVID-19 testing during the Unity in the Community food distribution event at the 36th Street North Event Center on Friday, June 5 from 4-7 p.m. Testing will be set up next door in the parking lot of the Greater Union Baptist Church, 955 E 36th St N, Tulsa, OK 74106. No appointment is necessary. Individuals can walk up, bike or drive-thru. Call the Tulsa Health Department at 918-582-9355 with questions. Additional testing information can be found here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 3 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 6,805 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are two additional deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours, all died between May 28 and May 31.

  • One in Adair County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Texas County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 341 total deaths in the state.

The COVID-19 data tracker will continue showing COVID-19 data for all 77 counties, to include counties that are smaller than 20,000 population. On Monday, the OSDH announced that the agency will no longer be able to publish COVID-19 data by city, zip code, or by long-term care and nursing home facility. For more information on this change, please click here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 2 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 6,692 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are five additional deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours, all died between May 11 and May 30.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • Three in Tulsa County, two females in the 65 and older age group and one female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Washington County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 339 total deaths in the state.

By the end of today, the COVID-19 data tracker will resume showing COVID-19 data for all 77 counties, to include counties that are smaller than 20,000 population. On Monday, OSDH announced that the agency will no longer be able to publish COVID-19 data by city, zip code, or by long-term care and nursing home facility due to the State’s Catastrophic Emergency Declaration expiring on May 31, 2020. For more information on this change, please click here.

OSDH released a Contact Tracing Overview document explaining the purpose of contact tracing in reducing the spread of COVID-19 and informing the public on what to expect when contacted by a health department contact tracer. A copy of the full contact tracing release can be found here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

June 1 Update

OSDH Provides Contact Tracing Guidance, Increases Tracers

OKLAHOMA CITY (June 1, 2020) – In light of increased contact tracing efforts in the state, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) released today a Contact Tracing Overview document to inform the public on what to expect when contacted by a health department contact tracer.

Contact tracing is a method aimed at reducing the spread of an infectious disease like COVID-19 and involves public health department employees contacting people who have tested positive for the disease. Contact tracers ask questions to find out who may have been in contact with the COVID-19 patient in order to provide symptom checking, testing information and quarantine guidance when needed. An overview of contact tracing can be found here. An informational video can also be viewed below.

“Testing and contact tracing are key elements in the ongoing fight to limit the spread of COVID-19,” Interim Health Commissioner Lance Frye said. “Through public-private partnerships that include trained professionals from the Oklahoma National Guard, the University of Oklahoma, and Oklahoma State University, we are pleased to have quickly grown our state’s contact tracing team to nearly 600 individuals.”

Trained contact tracers working on behalf of state and county health departments begin most investigations with a phone call and are required to follow all scripts, policies and procedures provided by the OSDH. Other forms of communication, including text messages, email, social media, and in-person contact are used if the initial calls are not successful.

The OSDH urges people to be aware that the State’s contact tracers will never request personal information, such as a social security number, bank account, or credit card number, nor will they send emails or texts requesting a click on a link or an attachment.

People who think they may have received a fraudulent text or other communication from someone posing as public health official should immediately contact the Oklahoma State Department of Health at (405) 271-5600.

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 6,573 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

There are no additional deaths.

There are 334 total deaths in the state.

The OSDH announced today that its COVID-19 data tracker, located at coronavirus.health.ok.gov, will continue reporting active and recovered COVID-19 cases by county only, as permitted by State law, and the agency will no longer be able to publish COVID-19 data by city, zip code, or by long-term care and nursing home facility due to the State’s Catastrophic Emergency Declaration expiring on May 31, 2020. For more information on this change, please click here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

Oklahoma to begin Phase 3 of OURS plan

Additional guidance issued for individuals and businesses

OKLAHOMA CITY (May 29, 2020) – Oklahoma will proceed to Phase 3 of the Open Up and Recover Safely plan Monday, June 1, Governor Kevin Stitt announced Friday.

Oklahoma currently has just 708 active COVID-19 cases out of nearly 4 million residents and 5,236 people have already recovered.

Active cases in Oklahoma and Tulsa counties, the state’s two largest, make up less than 0.03 percent of the population in their respective counties.

As of May 28, 188,665 tests have been performed with just 3.77 percent coming back positive. Since Phase 2 of the OURS plan was initiated May 15, 69,914 tests have been performed and just 2.1 percent have been positive.

“We are making responsible decisions based on the data in our state,” said Gov. Stitt. “While cases continue to decline 36 days into our reopening, it is important Oklahomans remember COVID-19 is still in the United States and we must continue to be diligent about washing our hands frequently, maintaining physical distance and protecting our most vulnerable populations.”

Under Phase 3, businesses may resume unrestricted staffing at their worksites by observing proper CDC-recommended social distancing protocols and are recommended to continue increased cleaning and disinfecting practices.

Individuals should minimize time spent in crowded environments and continue following CDC guidelines regarding social distancing.

Additionally, summer camps are allowed to open provided they follow safety guidelines. Businesses that had been operating by appointment only may begin accepting walk-in clients at their discretion.

In conjunction with the Oklahoma State Department of Health and the statewide medical community, limited visitation to hospitals may be reinstated at the discretion of the facility.

As the data shows COVID-19 has a significantly more profound impact on the elderly and immunocompromised populations, visitation at nursing homes and long-term care facilities will remain suspended except for end-of-life situations until explicitly lifted by a future executive order.

While the data continues to improve on a statewide level, local governments are encouraged to make decisions that best fit their communities.

“Our measured approach to reopening has been a key reason why our data remains trending in a positive direction,” said Secretary of Health Jerome Loughridge. “It is vital that communities across the state only move to Phase 3 when their local data supports that decision. The OSDH and the Governor’s Solution Task Force are available to consult any local officials on the best practices for their specific areas.”

Free COVID-19 testing remains available to all Oklahomans at more than 80 locations across the state. Detailed information is available at coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

“As we enter Phase 3 of reopening, the Oklahoma State Department of Health will be focused on maintaining and expanding trusted partnerships with the public to help us minimize the presence of COVID-19,” said interim Commissioner of Health Lance Frye. “We remind Oklahomans they do not need to be experiencing symptoms to get tested for COVID-19 at our more than 80 county facilities. We also encourage Oklahomans to take calls from, and stay in communication with, our growing contact tracing team, which will be a powerful tool in ensuring we can protect public health and the state’s economy as we recover.”

The Catastrophic Health Emergency declaration will end Saturday, at which time Gov. Stitt will issue a new executive order keeping critical protections in place to allow state agencies to effectively manage the continued impact of COVID-19. This new executive order will encourage elderly and vulnerable Oklahomans to remain Safer at Home.

Industry-specific guidelines for safely reopening are available on the Department of Commerce website.

______
From Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt:

Oklahoma will begin Phase 3 of the Open Up and Recover Safely plan on June 1. As I’ve said, we will make responsible decisions based on the data in our state:

  • Our state has just 708 active cases out of nearly 4 million residents. 5,236 people have recovered.
  • Our positive test percentage continues to decline 36 days into the OURS plan. As of May 28, 188,665 tests have been performed with just 3.77 percent coming back positive. Since Phase 2 was initiated on May 15, 69,914 tests have been performed and just 2.1 percent have been positive.
  • Active cases in Oklahoma and Tulsa Counties, the two largest in our state, make up less than 0.03 percent of the population in their respective counties.

While the data supports our movement into Phase 3, it’s critical Oklahomans remember #COVID19 is still in the U.S. and we must continue to be diligent by washing our hands, maintaining physical distance and protecting our most vulnerable populations.

Oklahoma is setting an example to the nation of a community that works together, not against each other. Let’s continue to lead the way.

OURS Plan details
https://www.okcommerce.gov/…/Open-Up-and-Recover-Safely-Pla…

_____

OSDH Announces Adjustments to Publishing of COVID-19 Data

OKLAHOMA CITY (June 1, 2020) – The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) announced today that its COVID-19 data tracker, located at coronavirus.health.ok.gov, will continue reporting active and recovered COVID-19 cases by county only, as permitted by State law, and the agency will no longer be able to publish COVID-19 data by city, zip code, or by long-term care and nursing home facility due to the State’s Catastrophic Emergency Declaration expiring on May 31, 2020.

OSDH and the office of Governor Kevin Stitt are actively exploring additional legal opinions and solutions to ensure the public, the medical community, and elected leaders can access relevant COVID-19 data that will allow for quick and effective decision-making while Oklahoma awaits a treatment or vaccine to mute the novel virus.

“OSDH will continue to publish daily the most recent active and recovered COVID-19 cases by county,” said OSDH Communications Director Kristin Davis. “The State’s infrastructure is in a much stronger position for continuing to address the presence of the novel coronavirus, and the core purpose of the emergency declaration is no longer needed. At the same time, Governor Kevin Stitt and Commissioner Lance Frye continue their shared commitment to transparency and availability of critical COVID-19 data. They have tasked the State’s legal experts to explore other options for providing critical health data that would support all stakeholders’ decision making during the presence of COVID-19, while also safeguarding Oklahomans’ protected health information.”

The Legislature first granted the Governor’s request for a Catastrophic Emergency Health declaration on April 7, and the declaration was later extended until the end of May. Under the declaration, the Governor was able to redirect state agency resources and state employee efforts to respond to the COVID-19 crisis and was able to activate the Oklahoma National Guard. During this period, the Governor also waived statutory requirements to allow for more granular reporting of COVID-19 data to support rapid decision making at local levels on the response to COVID-19.

Since the Catastrophic Emergency Declaration went into effect, the number of Oklahomans in the hospital for COVID-19 has declined by roughly 65%, the weekly rate of deaths related to COVID-19 has declined by 56%, and the percentage of positive cases has declined to an all-time low of 3.7%.

While some data adjustments will be made, OSDH will continue to issue the daily media advisory with cumulative statewide COVID-19 data as well as publish the following reports:

May 29 Update

The Bartlesville City Council is expected to discuss and take possible action to adopt Ordinance No. 3528, repealing Ordinance No. 3527, related to the COVID-19 pandemic during its regularly scheduled meeting on Monday. The council will meet via Zoom at 7 p.m. on June 1. The meeting may be live-streamed via the City’s webcast, https://www.cityofbartlesville.org/city-government/city-council/webcast/.

To view the proposed ordinance, see COVID-19 Mitigation Measures Ordinance No. 3528.

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 6,338 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are three additional deaths; two of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the other died on May 23.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 65 and older age group
  • Two in Tulsa County, both males in the 65 and older age group

There are 329 total deaths in the state.

The State has surpassed its goal to collect and test more than 90,000 specimens in the month of May. As of Wednesday, May 27, the Oklahoma State Department of Health had processed 113,264 specimens collected for COVID-19 testing since the first of the month, with a total of 183,632 tests conducted since COVID-19 was first detected in early March. For more information on testing, click here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 28 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 6,270 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are four additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 22 and May 26.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Choctaw County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Jackson County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in McClain County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 326 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 27 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 6,229 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are four additional deaths; zero of them occurred in the past 24 hours all died between March 25 and May 25.

  • Two in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 and older age group and one female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Washington County, both females in the 65 and older age group.

There are 322 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 26 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, the State of Oklahoma has reported a total of 6,137 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19. Since our last Situation Report, the following number of positive cases were published daily at coronavirus.health.ok.gov:

  • Saturday – 111 new positives for a total of 5,960
  • Sunday – 77 new positives for a total of 6,037
  • Monday – 53 new positives for a total of 6,090
  • Tuesday – 47 new positives for a total of 6,137

There are seven additional deaths; zero of them occurred in the past 24 hours all died between May 22 and May 24.

  • Two in Oklahoma County, one male in the 65 and older age group and one female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Three in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 and older age group, one female in the 65 and older age group and one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Grady County, a female in the 36-49 age group.
  • One in Jackson County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 318 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 22 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 5,849 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are three additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 17 and May 20.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Texas County, a male in the 50-64 age group.

There are 307 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 21 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 5,680 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are five additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 14 and May 19.

  • Three in Oklahoma County, one female in the 65 and older age group, one male in the 65 and older age group and one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Washington County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 304 total deaths in the state.

Through a partnership with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma and The Caring Foundation, OSDH is deploying Caring Vans providing free COVID-19 testing to underserved communities in Oklahoma City, increasing testing accessibility. A Caring Van will be at the Latino Community Development Agency (lcdaok.com) today (5/21) from 4 to 7 p.m. COVID-19 testing is open to everyone 16 and older; people do not need to exhibit symptoms to be tested. More information can be found here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 20 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 5,532 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are five additional deaths; none of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 22 and May 18.

  • Two in Oklahoma County, both females in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 and older age group and one female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 299 total deaths in the state.

Through a partnership with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma and The Caring Foundation, OSDH is deploying Caring Vans providing free COVID-19 testing to underserved communities in Oklahoma City, increasing testing accessibility. A Caring Van will be at the Latino Community Development Agency (lcdaok.com) today (5/20) and tomorrow (5/21) from 4 to 7 p.m. COVID-19 testing is open to everyone 16 and older; people do not need to exhibit symptoms to be tested. More information can be found here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 19 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 5,489 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are six additional deaths; none of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 4 and May 17.

  • Three in Oklahoma County, two females in the 65 and older age group and a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in McIntosh County, a male in the 65 and older age group. 
  • Two in Washington County, both females in the 65 and older age group. 

There are 294 total deaths in the state.

As highlighted in the Governor’s EO report published Monday evening, the State has processed since Saturday 16,308 specimens tested for COVID-19, which is an average of 5,400 tests processed a day. As a result, the percentage of positives derived from Oklahoma’s total COVID-19 tests has declined again to an all-time low of 4.4 percent.

Through a partnership with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma and The Caring Foundation, OSDH is deploying Caring Vans providing free COVID-19 testing to underserved communities in Oklahoma City, increasing testing accessibility. This week, a Caring Van will be at the Latino Community Development Agency (lcdaok.com). COVID-19 testing is open to everyone 16 and older; people do not need to exhibit symptoms to be tested. More information can be found here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 18 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 5,398 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are no additional deaths.

There are 288 total deaths in the state.

On Sunday, OSDH reported 78 new positive COVID cases, for a total of 5,310 positives, and today the agency is reporting 88 new positive COVID-19 cases, for a total of 5,398 positives.

Of today’s new positive cases, 64 percent were in Texas County, where the agency is partnering with the CDC, businesses and the community on a robust testing and tracing strategy to contain and minimize further spread of COVID-19 throughout this region. More details on this effort can be read here.

Through a partnership with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma and The Caring Foundation, OSDH is deploying Caring Vans providing free COVID-19 testing to under-served communities in Oklahoma City, increasing testing accessibility. COVID-19 testing is open to everyone 16 and older; people do not need to exhibit symptoms to be tested. This week, a Caring Van will be at the Latino Community Development Agency (lcdaok.com). More information can be found here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 15 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 5,086 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There is one additional death; it occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Washington County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 285 total deaths in the state.

Today’s weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report will include data on antibody testing in the state. Reports from weeks past can be found here. 

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 14 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 4,962 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are six additional deaths; three of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 4 and May 11.

  • Two in Oklahoma County, a male in the 65 and older age group and a female in the 65 and older age group
  • Two in Cleveland County, both males in the 65 and older age group. 
  • One in Comanche County, a male in the 50-64 age group. 
  • One in Washington County, a female in the 65 and older age group.  

There are 284 total deaths in the state.

“Over the past week, OSDH has deployed several systems of support into Texas County and the surrounding areas to address a heightened presence of COVID-19. The largest employer in the county, Seaboard Foods, has been a good partner with state agencies by allowing OSDH to test all processing plant employees,” said Health Commissioner Gary Cox. “We are also partnering on guidance and solutions to ensure the company continues doing everything possible to protect its workers. Over the next few days, we expect spikes in our reporting of positive cases due to the significant number of tests processed for Texas County, which is reflective of our increased testing efforts.”

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 13 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 4,852 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are no additional deaths.

There are 278 total deaths in the state.

“For the second time this month, OSDH has received no reports of COVID-19 related deaths within a 24-hour period,” said Health Commissioner Gary Cox. “While this is a very hopeful development, OSDH is in the midst of rapidly expanding our contact tracing efforts to ensure Oklahoma can continue its significant progress to minimize the presence of COVID-19. As Commissioner, our agency’s top priority is to build and maintain a trusted partnership with the public so that, together, we can continue to conquer this novel virus through proper quarantine efforts, robust testing, and personal responsibility.”

“Today marks a milestone for our state as we see signs of our progress in the fight against COVID-19,” said Governor Kevin Stitt. “This is the result of our health care workers, emergency responders, state and local leaders, and Oklahomans who continue to make sacrifices and display the Oklahoma Standard every day. Our hearts are with the Oklahomans who have lost loved ones to this virus, and we will continue to take this fight very seriously as we move forward. COVID-19 is still in Oklahoma, and we will prioritize the health and safety of all four million Oklahomans.”

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 12 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 4,732 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are five additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 30 and May 9.

  • One in Tulsa County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Greer County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Ottawa County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Tillman County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 278 total deaths in the state.

Regional COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 9 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 4,490 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are four additional deaths; two of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 6 and May 7.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Delaware County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Pittsburg County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Washington County, a male in the 50-64 age group.

There are 270 total deaths in the state.

The OSDH published its third expanded weekly epidemiology and surveillance report on COVID-19, highlighting the continued downward trend in the percentage of positive COVID-19 tests in relation to overall testing being conducted in Oklahoma. A copy of this week’s Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report can be found here.

OSDH is excited to partner with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma to bring Caring Vans to our state’s under-served areas for COVID-19 testing. Caring Vans will be at select locations today. COVID-19 testing is open to everyone; individuals do not need to exhibit symptoms to be tested. More information on our testing site locations can be found here.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 8 Update

From the Oklahoma Department of Health:

Oklahoma State Department of Health Rolls Out Caring Vans

COVID-19 testing effort ramped up with goal to test 90,000 Oklahomans in May

Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) Commissioner Gary Cox is encouraging all Oklahomans to get tested for COVID-19 as soon as possible with a goal to test 90,000 people during the month of May.

Through a partnership with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma and The Caring Foundation, OSDH is deploying four Caring Vans providing free COVID-19 testing to underserved communities in Oklahoma City, increasing testing accessibility. COVID-19 testing is open to everyone; people do not need to exhibit symptoms to be tested.

“As the state enters the first phase of a measured reopening, testing becomes even more vital to health officials and Oklahomans who use data to make informed decisions to protect health,” said Health Commissioner Gary Cox. “We want everyone to get tested, regardless of whether or not they are currently showing symptoms, so we can improve early detection of new clusters and hot spots as they arise and aggressively mitigate spread.”

The OSDH is committed to working closely with public health and community leaders in the formation of innovative partnerships to ramp up testing capacity, going beyond traditional drive-thru sites to a more mobile model statewide.

Please visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov for additional COVID-19 testing information.

Daily report

As of this advisory, there are 4,424 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are six additional deaths; two of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 2 and May 6.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Caddo County, a male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Cotton County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Le Flore County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Washington County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 266 total deaths in the state.

The OSDH has updated the COVID-19 Mobility Dashboard. To learn more about our newly expanded feature, please view this video or visit our website landing page here.

OSDH is excited to partner with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma to bring Caring Vans to our state’s under-served areas for COVID-19 testing. Caring Vans will be at select locations today and Saturday. COVID-19 testing is open to everyone; individuals do not need to exhibit symptoms to be tested. For more information, please review the full news release.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 6 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 4,201 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are six additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 2 and May 4.

  • Four in Oklahoma County, three females in the 65 and older age group and a male in the 50-64 age group
  • One in Cleveland County, a female in the 65 and older age group
  • One in Creek County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 253 total deaths in the state.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health would like to mark National Nurses Day by thanking all the hard-working nurses for their continued dedication during the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information, see https://coronavirus.health.ok.gov/articles/osdh-recognizes-national-nurses-day

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 5 Update

As of this advisory, there are 4,127 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are nine additional deaths; two of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 26 and May 3.

  • Three in Oklahoma County, a female in the 65 and older age group, a male in the 65 and older age group and a male in the 50-64 age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, a female in the 65 and older age group and a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Delaware County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Lincoln County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Texas County, a male in the 50-64 age group.

There are 247 total deaths in the state.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that individuals use cloth face coverings in public situations where social distancing might be difficult to maintain. Please follow this guide on how use, make and wear cloth face coverings.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 4 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 4,044 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are 238 total deaths in the state.

Feeling sick? Not sure what to do? Visit the Symptom Checker on the Oklahoma State Department of Health website to determine next steps. If you are unable to contact your medical provider or local health department, please call 2-1-1 to reach the 24/7 COVID-19 call center.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

May 1 Update

City Beat: Council OKs new Covid-19 ordinance

Bartlesville City Council passes City Ordinance No. 3527

See ordinance here: https://www.cityofbartlesville.org/city-council-oks-new-covid-19-ordinance/

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 3,748 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are eight additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 21 and April 29.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Three in Washington County, two males in the 65 and older age group and a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Comanche County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Pontotoc County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 230 total deaths in the state.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health is excited to partner with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma to bring Caring Vans to our state’s under-served areas for COVID-19 testing. We appreciate all the public health professionals who make this service possible.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

April 30 Update

As of this advisory, there are 3,618 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. There are eight additional deaths; five of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 23 and April 28.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Delaware County, both females in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in McClain County, both females in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Grady County, a male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Mayes County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, a male in the 65 and older age group.

There are 222 total deaths in the state.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

April 29 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 3,473 confirmed positive cases of Covid-19 in Oklahoma. There are seven additional deaths; three of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 16 and April 26.

  • Two in Oklahoma County, a male in the 65 and older age group and a male in the 36-49 age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Garvin County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Kay County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Muskogee County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Washington County, a male in the 50-64 age group.

There are 214 total deaths in the state.

On Tuesday, Gov. Kevin Stitt called for all Covid testing locations and providers to expand access to all Oklahomans who desire to be tested, even without demonstrating symptoms.

Drive-thru Covid-19 testing is now available at the Oklahoma Health Center in coordination with the University of Oklahoma. If you are experiencing symptoms, call 405-271-7774 to make an appointment. More information can be found here.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

April 28 Update

City Council to consider local Covid-19 measures at Thursday meeting

The City Council will hold a special meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 30, via videoconferencing to review the City’s current Covid-19 mitigation measures and take possible action on an ordinance to amend them.

For more information, see https://www.cityofbartlesville.org/covid-19-agenda-thursday-meeting/

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 3,410 confirmed positive cases of Covid-19 in Oklahoma. There are 10 additional deaths; none of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 22 and April 26.

  • Four in Tulsa County, a male in the 65 and older age group, a female in the 65 and older age group, a male in the 50-64 age group, and a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • Three in Washington County, two females in the 65 and older age group and a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Caddo County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Delaware County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 207 total deaths in the state.

A list of Covid-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

CDC adds Covid-19 symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control has added to its list of Covid-19 symptoms. People with these symptoms or combinations of symptoms may have Covid-19:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
Or at least two of these symptoms:
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell
Symptoms may appear two to 14 days after exposure to the virus.

April 27 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 3,280 confirmed positive cases of Covid-19 in Oklahoma. There are three additional deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 24 and April 25.

  • One in Tulsa County, a male in the 65 and older age group
  • One in Carter County, a female in the 50-64 age group
  • One in Wagoner County, a female in the 65 and older age group

There are 197 total deaths in the state.

The American Association on Health and Disability has created a survey to assess health care and health care access challenges people with disabilities are encountering with the Covid-19 pandemic.The survey is open until May 1 and can be found here

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

CDC adds Covid-19 symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control has added to its list of Covid-19 symptoms. People with these symptoms or combinations of symptoms may have Covid-19:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
Or at least two of these symptoms:
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

April 24 Update

New executive order issued by governor

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt’s new executive order is now available for review. City officials are reviewing the order along with the governor’s “Open Up and Recover Safely Plan” and the White House’s guidance on re-opening. To view the order, see Governor’s Executive Order 2020-13 4th Amendment.

Officials expect governor’s new executive order later today

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt held a press conference Wednesday to announce a multi-phased plan to re-open the state’s economy that would rescind portions of the governor’s executive order issued last month — including measures that would allow personal care businesses to resume business today and restaurants to re-open on May 1. City Manager Mike Bailey said he expects the governor’s new executive order to be available for review today.

To view this story in its entirety, see City ordinance in effect until council review.

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 3,121 confirmed positive cases of Covid-19 in Oklahoma.

There are nine additional deaths; three occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 17 and April 22:

  • Two in Oklahoma County, a male in the 36-49 age group and female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Caddo County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Sequoyah County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Creek County, a male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Ottawa County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 188 total deaths in the state.

To provide an up-to-date review of epidemiological data about Covid-19 in the state, the OSDH is releasing today a new Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report. This report provides an in-depth review of data collected April 17-23 and new changes in the classification of cases.

The American Association on Health and Disability (AAHD) has created a survey to assess health care and health care access challenges people with disabilities are encountering with the Covid-19 pandemic.The survey is open until May 1 and can be found here.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

April 23 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 3,017 confirmed positive cases of Covid-19 in Oklahoma.

There are nine additional deaths; six occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 18 and April 21.

  • Two in Cleveland County, a male and female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Washington County, a male and female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Oklahoma County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Creek County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Caddo County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Muskogee County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 179 total deaths in the state.

The OSDH implemented a COVID-19 data dashboard to display statistics, including sortable data by county and zip code.

In an effort to help the public make best use of the dashboard, a tutorial video created by OSDH Director of Public Policy and Health Promotion Buffy Heater, can be found here.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

April 22 Update

Governor hold press conference regarding Covid-19

The Oklahoma Department of Commerce posted a multi-phased plan for Oklahomans to “Open up and recover” in conjunction with a press conference by Gov. Kevin Stitt earlier today. The press conference may be viewed here: https://www.facebook.com/GovStitt/videos/554538908806349/

The plan may be viewed at https://www.okcommerce.gov/wp-content/uploads/Open-Up-and-Recover-Safely-Plan.pdf

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 2,894 confirmed positive cases of Covid-19 in Oklahoma.

There are six additional deaths; two occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 5 and April 20.

  • One in Caddo County, a female in the age group of 65 and older.
  • One in Cleveland County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Cotton County, a female in the age group of 65 and older.
  • One in Rogers County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Washington County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Pittsburg County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • There are 170 total deaths in the state.

A list of COVID-19 testing sites in the state can be found here.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

April 21 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

There are 21 additional deaths in Oklahoma; five occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 14-April 19.

  • Four in Delaware County; a male and female in the 50-64 age group and two males in the age group of 65 and older.
  • Four in Washington County, a two females and two males in the 65 and older age group.
  • Four in Wagoner County, a female in the 50-64 age group, and two males and a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Three in Tulsa County, a female and male in the 50-64 age group and a male in the age group of 65 and older.
  • Two in Kay County, a female in the 50-64 age group and a female in the age group of 65 and older.
  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Greer County, a female in the age group of 65 and older.
  • One in Bryan County, a male in 50-64 age group.
  • One in Comanche County, a male in the age group of 65 and older.

There are 164 total deaths in the state.

 

April 17 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health
OSDH Releases COVID-19 Symptom Tracker, Data on Positive Cases by City

The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH), in partnership with Google and Looker, is launching the COVID-19 Symptom Tracker and COVID-19 Data Dashboard. 

 “I’m thrilled to offer this resource to the citizens of Oklahoma as we enter into the predicted peak of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Commissioner of Health Gary Cox. “Getting testing information into the hands of people who are symptomatic is crucial to flattening the curve and the public dashboard that is populated with data from OSDH will give anyone the ability to see data drilled down to their city and zip code.” 

The symptom tracker asks residents to register their symptoms with OSDH via phone by calling 211 or the web. Based on the answers given, the tracker provides customized advice and could be used to schedule tests, ask for symptom updates and more. Updates, scheduling and advice are returned via SMS so there is no app to download. 

The COVID-19 Data Dashboard will give anyone the ability to look at city and zip code level data on positive cases, deaths and even the number of people with symptoms in their area.

April 16 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health

As of this advisory, there are 2,357 confirmed positive cases of Covid-19 in Oklahoma. There are eight additional deaths; three of which occurred in the past 24 hours with others who died between April 9 and April 14, including one female in the 65 and older age group in Washington County.

The OSDH, in partnership with Google and Looker, will release the COVID Symptom Tracker and accompanying dashboard that provides additional transparency on community spread in the state. For more information, visit www.coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

April 15 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:

As of this advisory, there are 2,263 confirmed positive cases of Covid-19 in Oklahoma. There are 15 additional deaths; four of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between April 3-April 13.

  • Three in Oklahoma County, three males in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, a male and female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Washington County, a female in the 18-35 age group and a female in the age group of 65 and older.
  • Two in Wagoner County, both males in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Adair County, a female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Texas County, a male in the 18-35 age group.
  • One in Rogers County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Grady County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Caddo County, a female in the 65 and older age group.

April 13 Update

From the Oklahoma State Health Department:
  • The OSDH is ramping up efforts to work with long term care facilities through onsite consultation, assessment and training to help prevent the spread of Covid-19 in facilities. 
  • OSDH continues to work with hospitals to prepare for a surge to the medical system in the coming weeks. 

April 10 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:
OSDH Releases COVID-19 modeling for Oklahoma, estimates April 21 peak

On the heels of more than 22,000 specimens tested for Covid-19 in Oklahoma, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) released today its modeling to forecast how the COVID-19 pandemic could occur in the state through May 1.

Authored by Aaron M. Wendelboe, PhD; Justin Dvorak, PhD; and Michael P. Anderson, PhD, the COVID-19 modeling identifies the following key metrics for Oklahoma:

Date of peak: April 21

  • Number of New Cases at the Peak: 436
  • Number of Deaths at the Peak: 22
  • Number of New Hospitalizations at the Peak: 131
  • Number of People in the Hospital for COVID at the Peak: 915
  • Number of People in the ICU for COVID at the Peak: 458

Cumulative number of Covid-19-positive cases by May 1: 9,300

Cumulative number of deaths by May 1: 469 deaths

“Over the past week, Oklahoma has significantly increased Covid-19 testing data due to expanded capacity at labs and more than 80 mobile testing locations across the state,” said Dr. Aaron Wendelboe, interim state epidemiologist. “This new data gave our team of epidemiologists stronger insight to forecast a Covid-19 model for the State of Oklahoma. At this point, we are estimating that Oklahoma will hit peak demand on hospitals, ICU beds, and other critical medical supplies around April 21.”

A copy of OSDH’s COVID-19 forecasting can be read by clicking here, which includes charts and an explanation of modeling methodology.

April 9 Update

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:
If you have #COVID19 symptoms, please get tested! Testing is now available for anyone who has symptoms: cough, fever (100.4 or higher) and shortness of breath. For statewide testing and location information visit: coronavirus.health.ok.gov/drive-thru-tes

April 8 Update

Mental health services available

Grand Lake Mental Health Center is offering the following services for those in need:

  • We can get you set up for services without having to see you in person.
  • We can drop off an iPad at your home to connect your family to face-to-face counseling services whenever you need them.
  • We can provide counseling services over the phone.
  • We can get you set up with a medication appointment within 2-weeks of starting services.

To start services or for more information, visit www.glmhc.net or call 918-273-1841. Evenings and weekends call 1-800-722-3611.

From the Oklahoma Municipal League:
Governor ensures paid time off for emergency responders with Covid-19

Gov. Kevin Stitt issued Executive Order 2020-13, ensuring first responders such as correctional officers, law enforcement and fire personnel who work for state agencies will receive guaranteed paid time off if they contract COVID-19.

“Our first responders put their lives on the line every day to protect their fellow Oklahomans,” said Stitt. “There’s no opportunity to work from home in these jobs, so they need our support. I also encourage cities and counties across the state to provide the same benefits to their first responders.”

Executive Order 2020-13 also does the following:

  • Removes barriers that will allow more medical professionals to be on the front lines by encouraging licensing boards to ease requirements on physician assistants, nurse practitioners and retired physicians
  • Encourages the boards to increase opportunities for students and recent graduates who are not yet fully licensed to practice
  • Allows closed health care facilities to be re-opened and remove regulatory burdens that would create lag time in getting bed space to treat patients
  • Allows stretcher vans and stretcher aid vans to assist with emergencies and operate anywhere in the state
Drive-through testing open 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. today

A drive-through Covid-19 testing site will be available in Bartlesville from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, April 8 . The testing is free and available to anyone 16 or older who is currently experiencing a fever of 100.4 degrees, a cough or shortness of breath or in close contact to a laboratory-confirmed positive case within the last 14 days.

The service will be available at Tri County Tech, 6101 Nowata Rd, Bartlesville, as long as supplies remain available. Clients age 16 and 17 must have parental or guardian consent.

A physician’s order is not needed in order to be tested through the health department’s curbside testing option. However, established patients seeking testing are encouraged to contact their primary care provider.

For more information about the testing site, contact the Washington County Health Department at 918.335.3005. To learn more about Covid-19, call the Covid-19 call center at 877.215.8336 or 2-1-1 or visit https://coronavirus.health.ok.gov/

April 7 Update

City Council OKs additional restrictions

The City Council last night approved additional restrictions in response to the City’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic. See details here: https://www.cityofbartlesville.org/council-oks-restrictions-covid-19/

Drive-through testing site established

A drive-through Covid-19 testing site will be available in Bartlesville from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, April 8 . The testing is free and available to anyone 16 or older who is currently experiencing a fever of 100.4 degrees, a cough or shortness of breath or in close contact to a laboratory-confirmed positive case within the last 14 days. See details at City Beat, April 7 edition for details.

From the CDC: Face masks recommended

“The CDC continues to study the spread and effects of the novel coronavirus across the United States. We now know from recent studies that a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (“asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (“pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity — for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing — even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms. In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.”

See more here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover.html

CAB: No further recommendations at this time

The Covid-19 Emergency Advisory Board met via videoconference today. Actions taken include reviewing the current mitigation measures approved April 6 by the Council Council. The Board agreed there are no further recommendations at this time. CAB was created to oversee the City’s mitigation efforts and make recommendations to the City Council.

April 6 Update

City Council meeting

The Bartlesville City Council its regularly scheduled meeting via teleconference at 7 p.m. tonight. The council is expected to consider recommendations from the newly-created Covid-19 Emergency Advisory Board, which include additional restrictions in the City’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic. For details, see Council to consider additional restrictions.

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health:
Negative tests

Over the weekend, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) received more than 6,000 negative Covid-19 test results reported by private labs dating back to February. The agency continues to collect negative test results from private labs and will make the final count known to the public when they are finalized. This will help provide a full picture of the total testing in Oklahoma.

Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corp recruiting volunteers

In an effort to prepare for medical surge and prolonged response to Covid-19 in the state, the Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps (OKMRC) is recruiting volunteers to serve in medical and non-medical positions.

Lezlie Carter, OKMRC state coordinator, said volunteers are needed to serve in multiple capacities, but there is an increased need for those with medical training. Licensed medical professionals may be needed to assist with triage, supplementing hospital personnel, monitoring critical patients, assisting with transporting patients and providing critical care in the field.

“We are preparing for a surge to our state’s medical system,” said Carter. “It is important for us to begin processing new volunteers now so they are properly registered and trained for their role within the OKMRC.”

Other functions include specialty services such as the Stress Response Team where licensed mental health professionals provide behavioral and emotional support at hospitals, shelters, phone banks, community outreach teams, first responders and more.

Volunteers without medical training are needed for warehouse support, record keeping and administrative duties. All volunteers must be at least 18 years of age, live or work in Oklahoma, agree to a comprehensive background check and complete the OKMRC training.

Coordinated through the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH), the OKMRC is the state’s only medical and public health volunteer program comprised of specialty teams and county units operating under the authority of local county health departments. The program has an established system to identify, train and organize medical and public health professionals, as well as volunteers from the public to supplement and support ongoing response operations and personnel.

The concept of the Medical Reserve Corps was created in 2002 after many Americans wanted to know how to help with the recovery efforts from Sept. 11, 2001. It has since evolved into a nationwide program.

To volunteer or to learn more about OKMRC functions, visit okmrc.org.

April 4 Update

Washington County Health Department announces 1st death in county

The Washington County Health Department, along with the Oklahoma State Department of Health, on Saturday announced the first death associated with Covid-19 in Washington County. According to WCHD, the patient was a female in the 65-plus age group.

All Oklahomans who are 65 years of age or older, or children and adults with weakened immune systems, are instructed to shelter at home until April 30 unless they are getting groceries and prescriptions, or taking a walk for daily exercise. Those who are sick or think they have Covid-19 should self-isolate at home in a room away from others in the household. Common symptoms include a fever and cough.

April 3 Update

City Council to consider additional restrictions

The Bartlesville City Council will meet Monday, April 6, to review City Ordinance No. 3525, which put in place several measures to help reduce spread of Covid-19. The council is expected to consider amendments to that ordinance as well as consider approval of City Ordinance No. 3526, which would put additional restrictions in place as numbers of infection and deaths due to the virus rise across the globe. For more information, see City Beat Bulletin.

April 2 Update

Mayor extends State of Emergency

In an effort to prepare for the possibility of even tighter restrictions in the City’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic, Bartlesville Mayor Dale Copeland today extended a proclamation declaring a State of Emergency for the city.

See details here: State of Emergency Extended: Tighter restrictions to be considered by City Council

April 1 Update

CAB holds 1st meeting

The Covid-19 Emergency Advisory Board held its first meeting on March 31. The Board, created by the City Council with the passage of Municipal Ordinance No. 3525, is tasked with evaluating measures taken by the City of Bartlesville in response to the coronavirus outbreak and advising the City Council on what more needs to be done.

For details about the Board’s discussion, see Medical experts say daycares should close.

To view the meeting in its entirety, see City of Bartlesville webcast.

From the Oklahoma State Department of Health

The state now has supplies to test more than 13,000 individuals for Covid-19. Commissioner of Health Gary Cox and Governor Kevin Stitt urge health care providers and testing centers to loosen testing requirements and to offer testing to any Oklahoman with symptoms of Covid-19. Read the commissioner’s public letter here

  • The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) is working to open additional drive-thru Covid-19 testing locations across the state. Find the drive-thru locations open today by clicking here.
  • The governor expanded his Executive Order yesterday, adjusting the time frame for non-essential businesses to suspend services as well as the suspension of elective surgeries and minor medical procedures.
  • The state’s “Safer at Home” order continues to apply until April 30 for all Oklahomans 65 and older, as well as those with compromised immune systems. 
  • For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

March 31 Update

City moves to teleconference meetings

The City of Bartlesville is no longer holding in-person meetings but instead has implemented teleconferencing for employees, elected officials and boards and committees, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Meetings will be live-streamed via the City’s website and aired live on local cable television’s Channel 56 as always.

This is in accordance with Oklahoma Senate Bill 661, which is an effort to implement social distancing and mitigate the spread of the Covid-19 virus.

Anyone who would like to submit comments prior to a meeting for council or board review may do so by emailing covid-19@cityofbartlesville.org.

In the News

City Manager Mike Bailey and Police Chief Tracy Roles spoke with Bartlesville Monthly Magazine during a live interview on March 27.

Covid-19 Update

Thank you City Manager Mike Bailey and Chief of Police Tracy Roles for speaking with us today and updating us on the changes that continue to take place concerning the effects on Bartlesville and Washington County due to Coronavirus. A great resource page for the latest information is www.cityofbartlesville.org . That is where you will find City Beat, as well as other links that are excellent sources with up to date information. We encourage everyone to stay positive and keep an eye out for your neighbors, the elderly, or anyone you think may be struggling. Here are some links for local mental health providers who are still serving our community via tele-health communication. Grand Lake Mental Health Centerhttps://www.glmhc.net/covid-19_id114WE ARE OPEN and taking every precaution to protect the health of our community.Our services are available to current and new clients through traditional and telehealth methods. · New & current clients, call 918-273-1841 to make an appointment· If you are in crisis, call our 24/7 Crisis Line 1-800-722-3611 (for anyone!!)· We are closely monitoring this everchanging situation. We will keep you posted of new developments regarding our services. Daysprings Community Serviceshttp://pfh.org/dayspring quote from Clinical supervisor: "It is normal to have a wide range of emotions and anxiety during this national health crisis. Daysprings cares about our community and offers a variety of services. During this stressful time we are offering video and telehealth services to current clients as well as new ones. Tele health provides a safe and secure way for clients to speak to their providers from their phone, tablet or computer. We offer health home program that provides wellness for clients and tele-medication services from our psychiatrists. For more information call 918-876-4211 or Sheri Robertson, Clinical supervisor at 918-213-9899 https://www.samaritanbartlesville.org/ Samaritan counseling245 SE Madison Blvd.Bartlesville, OK 74006Phone: 918-336-1463Fax: 918-331-9717E-mail: samgro@cableone.netSamaritan Counseling & GrowthTele health provided nowCenter provides services in Bartlesville and Northeastern Oklahoma to individuals, couples and families needing counseling or psychotherapy. We also offer workshops and seminars as well as consultationsfor employers and caregivers. http://www.youthandfamilyinc.com/home.htmlYouth and Family Servicesproviding tele health apptsadult and children counseling, parenting classes , DUI support groups etc.200 SE Washington Blvd918-335-1111 https://wilsonpsychological.com/Wilson psychological Associatesgood info on the link. https://www.namioklahoma.org/about-mental-illnessGood website for general information and crisis line: Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255​Crisis Text Line: text "NAMI" to 741741

Posted by Bartlesville Monthly Magazine on Friday, March 27, 2020